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Glass: Engine of Progress

For the exhibition ‘Glass: Engine of Progress’ we asked type designer Benjamin Sporken to design a custom font that is a contemporary re-imagination of 19th century grotesk types. 

Paxton is conceived to be the work-horse for the exhibition, having to convey captions as well as large introductory texts and (sub)titles. The font features a large set of glyphs, including very specific typographic marks like a No sign, Roman numerals and special ligatures for all these th’s in ‘19th century’.

As the visual research for the font started of by carefully examining a range of examples of types that were being used in the exhibits of the Great Exhibition of the Industry of the Nations of 1851, we thought it apt to name it after the architect of its pavilion, the Crystal Palace: Joseph Paxton.

a b >
Glass: Engine of Progress

For the exhibition ‘Glass: Engine of Progress’ we asked type designer Benjamin Sporken to design a custom font that is a contemporary re-imagination of 19th century grotesk types. 

Paxton is conceived to be the work-horse for the exhibition, having to convey captions as well as large introductory texts and (sub)titles. The font features a large set of glyphs, including very specific typographic marks like a No sign, Roman numerals and special ligatures for all these th’s in ‘19th century’.

As the visual research for the font started of by carefully examining a range of examples of types that were being used in the exhibits of the Great Exhibition of the Industry of the Nations of 1851, we thought it apt to name it after the architect of its pavilion, the Crystal Palace: Joseph Paxton.

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